The Democratic Fallout: It’s down to Clinton vs. Brown

In last month’s issue of The Forerunner, we introduced “A Series on the Presidential Candidates.” In this month’s issue, we had planned to cover at least three of the Democratic Party’s offerings for the presidential nominee. But oh, how seasons change!

In just one month every viable Democratic challenger to Arkansas Governor Bill Clinton has dropped out of the race. In a series of primaries more resembling a demolition derby than an electoral process, every one of the Democrats have been bested by Clinton; everyone, that is, except former California Governor Jerry Brown, who maintains that he will keep Clinton from the nomination. Also, Paul Tsongas, who mysteriously left the race before an almost guaranteed victory in Connecticut, has hinted that he may reenter the race depending how he does in future primaries.

No one knows for sure exactly why Clinton seems to have lost momentum after having demolished virtually every contender. At press time, the Tsongas’ vote seems to have swung in favor of the ultra-liberal Brown, rather than who would be the former Massachusetts Senator’s preference: the more moderate Clinton. This indicates that the pro-Tsongas vote may have been due to an anti-Clinton sentiment among Democrats. There is a “Draft Tsongas” movement within the Democratic Party that may keep delegates away from Clinton that are crucial to his nomination.

No political commentator seems to know exactly what to make of Brown’s candidacy. Every joke imaginable has been lobbed in his direction in an attempt to ridicule his quixotical image as he lunges toward the Democratic convention. Yet Brown seems destined to make a showing delegates intact. It may be that the combined showing of Brown and Tsongas could delay Clinton from the nomination long enough for mounting charges against his character to undermine his candidacy. If this scenario (although unlikely) were to happen, the Democratic convention could become a chaotic free-for-all with still more candidates entering and reentering the contest.

Meanwhile, George Bush continues to win against Pat Buchanan in every contest. Buchanan’s unexpectedly strong showing will undoubtedly work in favor of maintaining a solidly conservative platform at the Republican convention. Barring some history making fluke in the electoral college process, The Forerunner predicts that George Bush will win the November 10 election and will remain our President for four more years. A third party candidacy, however, could tilt the electoral college toward another candidate, Democrat or otherwise.

Despite anger among the electorate and a strong protest vote in the primaries, President Bush is still the safest bet for conservative and Christian voters. Being the most electable candidate, however, should not give George Bush automatic approval over the other candidates. Intelligent and concerned voters should not ignore the moral strengths and weaknesses of the other candidates, and should at least seriously scrutinize them. Therefore, we will continue to examine the candidates in contention, Democratic, Republican and Independent, until the November election.

Your comments are welcome

Use Textile help to style your comments

Suggested products

DVD

The Silent Scream

Ronald Reagan changed his view as a result of watching The Silent Scream – a movie he considered so powerful and convicting that he screened it at the White House.

Read more

DVD

Freedom

The Model of Christian Liberty. This DVD includes “Dawn’s Early Light: A Brief History of America’s Christian Foundations” and bonus features.

Read more