Four Methods of Interpretation

Video: Four Methods of Interpretation
Four Methods of Interpretation
Click play to connect to youtube

The manner in which we interpret the Bible (hermeneutics) will have something to do with our millennial viewpoint. However, we can arrive at very different conclusions about the millennium or the end-times using either a preterist, historicist, futurist or idealist approach to the Bible. The definitions of these hermeneutical approaches are as follows.

Book

In the Days of These Kings

Jay Rogers

The Book of Daniel in Preterist Perspective

The overarching message of Daniel is that Jesus the Messiah is even now ruling over the nations. He is the King of kings. Daniel tells us that Messiah’s kingdom will advance in the whole world from “generation to generation” (Daniel 4:4,34). Christ’s dominion is “given to the people of the saints of the most High” (Daniel 7:22). Our purpose then is to see “all people, nations, and languages … serve and obey him” (Daniel 7:14,27).

This comprehensive work offers a fascinating look at the book of Daniel in preterist perspective. Great attention is paid to the writings of ancient and modern historians and scholars to connect the dots and demonstrate the continuity of Daniel’s prophecy with all of Scripture.

Read more

Preterism: This is the “before-times view.” Most of the prophecies of Daniel, the Mount Olivet Discourse (Matthew 24) and Revelation were literally fulfilled by AD 70. The Book of Revelation and the Mount Olivet Discourse are thought to deal with the coming persecution of the Church by Caesar Nero and the destruction of the Jewish Temple at Jerusalem.

Historicism: This view states that the prophecies of the Book of Revelation were fulfilled sometime in history, but not in the first century or in the future. The black plague of the Middle Ages might be interpreted to be one of the plagues brought by the four horsemen of Revelation 6. The pope at the time of Martin Luther is often thought to be the Beast of Revelation 13.

Futurism: This is the “end-times view.” Most of the prophecies of the Mount Olivet Discourse (Matthew 24) and the Book of Revelation are yet to be fulfilled. The locust plague of Revelation 9 might be interpreted to be Cobra helicopters, and the northern invader of Israel described in Ezekiel 38 might be an invading Russian army.

Idealism: This is also called the “spiritualist view.” This view states that the prophecies of Revelation are not to be taken literally, but have a general and symbolic application in all history. The heavenly battle of Revelation 12 is thought to describe the ongoing battle between good and evil in the spiritual realm. The millennium itself represents the kingdom of God, which is heavenly and not of this world.

I will be describing a postmillennial eschatology according to a preterist view of Daniel, Matthew 24 and Revelation. However, not all postmillenialists of history were preterists. Most have been historicists.

  • Most postmillennialists are either preterists or historicists; a few are idealists.
  • Most amillennialists are either idealists or historicists; a few are preterists and futurists.
  • Most classical premillennialists are either futurist or historicist in their approach to Revelation; a few are preterists.
  • Nearly all dispensational premillennialists put virtually every biblical prophecy about judgment in a seven year tribulation that is thought to be coming in the near future.

Your comments are welcome

Use Textile help to style your comments

Suggested products

DVD

The Silent Scream

Ronald Reagan changed his view as a result of watching The Silent Scream – a movie he considered so powerful and convicting that he screened it at the White House.

Read more

DVD

Freedom

The Model of Christian Liberty. This DVD includes “Dawn’s Early Light: A Brief History of America’s Christian Foundations” and bonus features.

Read more